Summer Circle at the Cape Cod Museum of Art

18 May Summer Circle at the Cape Cod Museum of Art

 
The Circle of Cape Cod Artists – Past, present, and future
With its  summer Circle of Cape Cod Artists exhibits, visitors to the Cape Cod Museum of Art will learn more about the communities of artists that have always been attracted to the Cape’s openness to creating new ways to see and to bring art into our lives, explains Angela Bilski, CMoA operations director.    
The public is invited to the public receptions of these three major shows:
           
Modernists Out of the Mainstream
and Connections: Visual Fellows of the Cape
Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Fine Arts Work Center
Public Reception for Modernists & Connections on June 7 – 5:30 – 7:30
Preceded by a Gallery Talk with artists in Connections at 4:30 pm
 
Beyond the Tattoo – Mark Corliss
Sponsored by First Citizens Federal Credit Union
Public Reception with Mark Corliss & Models – June 21 – 5:30 – 7pm

 

          Modernists Out of the Mainstream (June 7 – August 5, 2018presents an historical view of important Cape Cod artists with works from the Museum’s permanent collection.  These 20th Century artists were experimenting with the elements of art and contributing to the dynamic art movements that set America at the center of the art world.
            Connections: Visual Fellows of the Cape (June 1 – September 9, 2018celebrates the 50th Anniversary of the Fine Arts Work Center. CCMoA puts the spotlight on artists who originally came to the Cape on fellowships to FAWC in Provincetown and decided to stay on the Cape and mature in their work.   They have continued finding new ways of seeing that reflect their personal directions in the contemporary art world.   
            Beyond the Tattoo – Mark Corliss (June 21 – August 5, 2018is sponsored by First Citizens Federal Credit Union   This exhibition presents the work of Hyannis tattoo artist Mark Corliss that reflects his love of the traditional Japanese design.  Beyond the traditional, Corliss uses his artistic skills of shading, coloring and adding dimension with ink beneath the skin to create life-like nipples for women who have had mastectomies.   
           

 
More about Modernists Out of the Mainstream
Gallery Talk with Art Writer & Co-curator Deborah Forman – June 14, 1:15 pm
 
As the museum pays tribute to these artists, we expect some viewers will make a discovery of art new to them, to be appreciated for its aesthetic qualities and originality. – Deborah Forman, co-curator
 
CCMoA exhibits artists in its collection who broke from tradition as they found new ways of looking at art during the 20th Century. They were part of an energetic movement influenced by European artists that established America as the center of the art world.
 
Some had witnessed the excitement of Fauvism and Cubism erupting in Paris and were pursuing a modern approach in the first decades of the 20thcentury. Some of these artists who spent time on the Cape have been selected by co-curators Deborah Forman and Michael Giaquinto from the collection for the exhibit.  They include Blanche Lazzell, Agnes Weinrich, Oliver Chaffee, Lucy L’Engle, Karl Knaths, and Thomas Eastwood.
 
Also included in the exhibition are works done during the second half of the last century when Abstract Expressionism had put America in the vanguard of contemporary art. Some artists, who took their own paths, didn’t always find the recognition that was bestowed upon others, yet their works are distinctively innovative. Many who captured the excitement after World War II are included in the show:  Xavier Gonzalez, William Littlefield, Boris Margo, Howard Gibbs, Kenneth Stubbs, Leo Manso, Nanno De Groot, Haynes Ownby, and Donald Stoltenberg, among others.
           
Deborah Forman, the well-known author of several books about Cape Cod artists, will give a Gallery Talk about the exhibition on June 14 at 1:15 pm. Free with Museum Admission.
More about Connections: Visual Fellows of the Cape
The Fine Arts Work Center offers emerging artists from around the world the time and space to develop their art in Provincetown.  This show in honor of FAWC’s 50th Anniversary celebrates both the extraordinary work of past Fellows and the Work Center’s core mission to sustain and invigorate the creative community of the Outer Cape.  CCMoA focuses on Fellows who chose to stay on the Cape to develop their art.  Well-known artists Bailey Bob Bailey and Bert Yarborough offer the reasons they stayed:
 
Upon arriving in Provincetown as a 1989 fellow at FAWC, it became evident immediately that I was home. It was the first true community I was welcomed into as an artist, both spiritually and physically. -Bailey Bob Bailey
 
I stayed on the Cape after my residency at the Fine Arts Work Center to take the Visual Coordinator position which I held for 4 years.  My time on the Cape, especially my work in the dunes, pine forests and the beaches in and around the Provincelands National Seashore, has formed the core of my work for over forty years.  From the execution of site-specific sculpture to drawings and watercolors, executed at Herring Cove and Hatches Harbor, the landscape of the lower cape, provided inspiration and sustenance to all my work, and continues to enrich these efforts today.  – Bert Yarborough
 
The 21 artists in the exhibit are: Bailey Bob Bailey, Susan Baker, Richard Baker, Paul Bowen, Linda Bond, James Esber, Bill Evaul, Jenny Fitts, Jane Fine, Jenny Humphreys, Janelle Iglesias, Maryalice Johnston, Irene Lipton, Susan Lyman, Nathalie Meibach, Jim Peters, Janice Redman, James Everett Stanley, Vicky Tomayko, Tabitha Vevers and Bert Yarborough.
 
More about Beyond the Tattoo – Mark Corliss
Once considered the mark of sailors, bikers and rebels, tattoos are now found on the bodies of all ages in all walks of life.  The sharing of practices and styles from Japan to Europe and the Americas has led to an explosion of artistic expression that has been recognized in major museums.  
 
Beyond the Tattoo presents the work of Hyannis tattoo artist Mark Corliss that reflects his love of the traditional Japanese design.  Beyond the decorative tattoo, Corliss has also used his artistic skills at shading, coloring and adding dimension with ink beneath the skin to create life-like nipples for women who have had mastectomies. 
 
For over 20 years, Corliss, seeped in the traditional tattoo art of the Japanese culture, has created thousands of large body tattoos from his own imagination or built on images his clients have requested.  What sets him apart from his peers is that he has also worked with over 400 women who have had mastectomies.  He does this for no charge, because he says “Art does heal.”
 
“Mark plays a big role in the reconstruction process,” said Dr. Michael Loffredo, a Hyannis plastic surgeon with whom Corliss has worked. “It’s the finishing step on a long journey that builds toward restoring the breast to be as natural as possible.”
 
The number of referrals from doctors and requests from women keeps growing and Corliss has begun to form a non-profit project to expand the service to more women and to train other tattoo artists around the country.     He chose the name Project Paper Crane because it is the traditional symbol of hope and healing.  It was believed that if one folded 1,000 origami cranes, one’s wish would come true.
 

This show represents a look forward to the ways in which art intersects with health as an integral part of life 

 
 
Founded by artists in 1981, CCMoA is the home of Cape Cod art.  It preserves the work of the Cape’s finest artists and celebrates the distinctive artistic identity of the Cape, the Islands and the region. The Museum is a major hub of cultural creativity.  It educates, inspires and excites the imagination through its outstanding art collection and diverse programming while caring for and connecting its many communities.  The Museum is situated in a beautiful setting surrounded by a Sculpture Garden at the Cape Cod Center for the Arts. CCMoA has seven galleries, a museum shop and a film screening room. It is supported in part by the Massachusetts Cultural Council and the Arts Foundation of Cape Cod.
            CCMoA is located at 60 Hope Lane, just off Route 6A, on the same campus as the Cape Cinema and the Cape Cod Playhouse in Dennis, MA. Hours are 10 am to 5 pm Tues through Sat and noon to 5 pm on Sunday.  Galleries are open  ARTfull Thursdays from 5 – 8 with no admission fee.  General Admission is $9, $7 for seniors and students 19+ with school ID, $5 for students 13 to 18, and free for children 12 & under. For more information, see www.ccmoa.org or call (508) 385-4477. Follow on Facebook and Instagram
 
 
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