The Provincetown Film Art Series This Fall and Winter

11 Nov The Provincetown Film Art Series This Fall and Winter

PRESENTED BY PAAM AND THE PROVINCETOWN FILM SOCIETY
WEDNESDAYS AT 7PM | SEASON PASSES OFFER DISCOUNT TO MEMBERS | WWW.PAAM.ORG/FILMART
This annual series is presented by PAAM and the Provincetown Film Society. Howard Karren, a former editor of Premiere Magazine and the current Arts Editor at the Provincetown Banner, curates the series, introduces each film, and leads a discussion afterward every other Wednesday at Waters Edge Cinema, 237 Commercial Street, Provincetown.
The Series Kick-Off Party is this Sunday, November 12 at 1pm, followed by a screening of Robert Altman’s Nashville at 2pm. Admission is $30 for PAAM members ($40 general admission), and is included in the cost of a Season Pass.

The films are grouped into four themes: Women See Women, Once Upon A Time 
in the East, The Politics of Art, and Places and Connections.

WOMEN SEE WOMEN
FILM STILL FROM THINGS TO COME
THE WEDDING PLAN (2016)
NOVEMBER 15
Writer-dir. Rama Burshtein; 1 hr 50 min; Israel; in Hebrew, subtitled
Rama Burshtein follows up on her remarkably astute feature debut, Fill the Void, with another, more comic vision of marriage among the ultraorthodox in Israel, in which a single woman goes ahead with wedding plans in the hopes that in three weeks, some miracle will intervene and she’ll find a groom.
TAKE THIS WALTZ (2011)
NOVEMBER 29
Writer-dir. Sarah Polley; 1 hr 56 min; Canada
How can a young Toronto journalist in a loving, prosperous marriage throw it all away for the tenuous lure of sexual abandon? There are no villains and only nice, smart people in this brilliant, languorous ode to millennial alienation and wanderlust from writer-director Sarah Polley (Away From Her; Stories We Tell).
TONI ERDMANN (2016)
DECEMBER 13
Writer-dir. Maren Ade; 2 hr 42 min; Germany; in German, subtitled
What, as an American comedy by a male filmmaker, would have likely ended up as the tired fable of a kooky iconoclastic father trying to free his uptight corporate daughter from her worst instincts, becomes instead, in Maren Ade’s hands, a father-daughter minuet that’s complex, respectful, funny and totally refreshing.
THINGS TO COME (2016)
JANUARY 3
Writer-dir. Mia Hansen-Løve; 1 hr 42 min; France; in French, subtitled
The ever-mesmerizing Isabelle Huppert and filmmaker Mia Hansen-Løve deliver a tour-de-force character study of a middle-aged philosophy teacher who, in a short span of time, loses her marriage and her job, and, instead of breaking down, fiercely continues anew on her own terms.
ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE EAST
FILM STILL FROM MOTHER
OLDBOY (2003)
JANUARY 10
Cowriter-dir. Chan-wook Park; 2 hr; South Korea; in Korean, subtitled
Chan-wook Park’s epic tragedy of lives consumed and wasted by revenge combines the fundamentals of ancient Greek and Shakespearean drama with the explosive visuals and comic-book violence of Hong Kong action flicks.
COLUMBUS (2017)
JANUARY 24
Writer-dir. Kogonada; 1 hr 44 min; USA
Columbus, Indiana, is a town filled with inspiring modernist architecture, and it serves as the subject for this contemplative film by Korean-born, Midwest-raised filmmaker Kogonada, in which two young people with the weight of parental illness on their shoulders meet there and find solace in each other’s company.
MOTHER (2009)
JANUARY 31
Cowriter-dir. Bong Joon-ho; 2 hr 9 min; South Korea; in Korean, subtitled
Another scintillating highlight of contemporary Korean cinema, Bong Joon-ho’s Mother is as much a critique of Korean society as it is a tribute to the personal will of the title character, an acupuncturist who refuses to give up till she proves that her dimwitted son is not guilty of a vicious murder.
UNCLE BOONMEE WHO CAN RECALL HIS PAST LIVES (2010)
FEBRUARY 7
Writer-dir. Apichatpong Weerasethakul; 1 hr 54 min; Thailand; in Thai, subtitled
A man on his deathbed with kidney failure recollects his past in the company of the ghost of his late wife. Like Ingmar Bergman’s Wild Strawberries, Weerasethakul’s spectacularly beautiful film mixes narrative and experimental cinema in a dreamlike blend as it enters the consciousness of a dying man.
THE POLITICS OF ART
FILM STILL FROM WOMEN ART REVOLUTION
PENNIES FROM HEAVEN (1981)
FEBRUARY 21
Dir. Herbert Ross; 1 hr 48 min; USA; Screenplay by Dennis Potter, 
based on his BBC miniseries
This dark, dark musical-about a struggling sheet-music salesman during the Depression who falls for a lonely schoolteacher-intermittently erupts into glittering song-and-dance routines set to the classic tunes of the era.
I KILLED MY MOTHER (2009)
MARCH 14
Writer-dir. Xavier Dolan; 1 hr 36 min; Canada; in French, subtitled
This is Québécois wunderkind Xavier Doland’s stylish first feature, in which he stars as a young artist who can’t seem to grow up and out of the alternately savage and affectionate relationship he has with his mother.
WOMEN ART REVOLUTION (2010)
MARCH 21
Dir. Lynn Hershman Leeson; 1 hr 23 min; USA
Through interviews and archival footage, Lynn Hershman Leeson’s documentary celebrates the feminist art movement and how it has transformed our culture.
EAT THAT QUESTION: FRANK ZAPPA IN HIS OWN WORDS (2016)
APRIL 4
Dir. Thorsten Schütte; 1 hr 33 min; USA
Rock guitarist and composer Frank Zappa refused to be categorized or compromised, and the music he created in the ’60s and ’70s reflects just that. This biographical documentary by Thosten Schütte lets Zappa define himself with the same gumption and individualism he brought to his art.
PLACES AND CONNECTIONS
FILM STILL FROM NEXT STOP, GREENWICH VILLAGE
ATLANTIC CITY (1980)
APRIL 18
Dir. Louis Malle; 1 hr 44 min; USA
This haunting film, written for the screen by playwright John Guare (Six Degrees of Separation; The House of Blue Leaves) and directed by Louis Malle, is set in aging, decrepit Atlantic City at the dawn of its casino era. Burt Lancaster plays an elderly gangster with a soft spot for Susan Sarandon as a young croupier.
THE WANDERERS (1979)
MAY 2
Dir. Philip Kaufman; 1 hr 52 min; USA
Based on the novel by Richard Price, The Wanderers follows the weirdly insular, almost magically real coming-of-age experiences of a “gang” of Bronx boys as their way of life slowly evaporates with the social revolution of the late ’60s.
NEXT STOP, GREENWICH VILLAGE (1976)
MAY 16
Writer-dir. Paul Mazursky; 1 hr 55 min; USA
As poignantly recalled by Paul Mazursky, the bohemian life of Greenwich Village in the 1950s is not quite as charming and sweet as it first appears.
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